Showcase Your Project!

Hot! The History Of Sacramento Rap (Part Three, The Fall)

During Sacramento’s rap peak in the 90?s, people were working together. Artists were on labels, labels and artists worked together pioneering a genre, and crews were hitting the road, spreading the word. After the dust had settled, Brotha Lynch Hung emerged as the new King of Sacramento rap music.

It was then that a plague rolled into Sacramento. That plague was ego. The ego plague would lead to the fall of Sacramento rap music as we knew it. In the 90?s, Sacramento’s big dog record label was still Black Market Records.

Although Black Market was selling thousands of units partnered with Priority Records, the Black Market/Priority relationship had gone sour. Fortunately for Ced Sing and Black Market, another major record label, Tommy Boy Records, had interest in distributing Black Market music. Tommy Boy Records wanted to go all out for Brotha Lynch and Black Market Records.

“Tommy Boy was ready to go, radio, they were prepared to do a movie, they were ready to do all of these things to promote Brotha Lynch. During that crucial time, he decided he doesn’t want to do the deal, cuz other people are spittin in his ear, saying we can do better for you,” Black Market’s Cedric Singleton reflects in anguish on The Fahrenheit Hour Urban Talk Show. Ced also accuses Priority of putting distrust of Black Market in Lynch’s ear.

Brotha Lynch Hung thought he was ready to run a record label. Boy, was he wrong.

“Now, this is where the third part of the series, The Fall Of Sacramento Rap, will start, with this very moment.” painfully cries First Degree The D.E. on The Fahrenheit Hour.

Brotha Lynch began thinking Black Market was taking advantage of him. A year after signing a 5 year deal with Black Market for big money (wanna find out how much, Fahrenheit Hour with Ced Sing), Lynch wanted out.

“My problem with Lynch is you signed a deal. and if you didn’t want deal, you should just turn in your records (4 more) and you’d be free to go, like X-Raided did,” Ced Sing rationalizes. Ced explains he’s given Lynch hundreds of thousands of dollars. However, later in the Fahrenheit Hour episode, Ced admits mistakes.

“I was there when he (Lynch) signed and got a check for (find out on Ced Sing’s feature on The Fahrenheit Hour).” First Degree reports.

Many people don’t understand that during this time, Ced Sing was in his 20?s, early 30?s, and was still wet behind the ears. “A lot people thought I knew about the music business like I know now, I didn’t know then, a lot of thing I had to learn.” Ced admits on The Fahrenheit Hour. “A lot of information I got from my attorney was actually bad information.” However, the damage, or perception of damage, was already done.

Read More:

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *